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Marc-Andre Fleury Q&A with Radio Canada [Translated]

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NEW YORK NY - NOVEMBER 29: Marc -Andre Fleury #29 of the Pittsburgh Penguins waits for play to resume against the New York Rangers during their game on November 29 2010 at Madison Square Garden in New York City.  (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)
NEW YORK NY - NOVEMBER 29: Marc -Andre Fleury #29 of the Pittsburgh Penguins waits for play to resume against the New York Rangers during their game on November 29 2010 at Madison Square Garden in New York City. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)
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Radio Canada's Jean-Francois Chaumont recently conducted a Q&A with Marc-Andre Fleury.  Some of the topics discussed are his transition from October to November, how he fought through the early slump that started off the season and his perceptions of Steve Stamkos, Kris Letang and, of course, Sidney Crosby.

Since the original product is available only in French, Pensburgh reader Becky unleashed one of her patented translations in record time.  As always, thanks to her for her continued efforts and eye for fresh content that we would otherwise not be privy too.

After the jump, the translation of Radio Canada's interview with MAF

The part that stands out to me the most is his recognition of Sid stepping up to support his goaltender.  Once again, however the media wishes to spin it (ie. challenging Dan Bylsma), Sid knows what he's doing and his teammates obviously take notice.

How would you describe the differences in your performances between October and November?

"I can answer this question pretty simply: there are more wins. Honestly, I don’t know how to describe it. Nothing was working for me in October. I found it really difficult. I wanted to win, but I just wasn’t able to do it. At the same time, Brent Johnson was playing some very good hockey, and it was logical to turn to him.

Now, it’s easier mentally, because the team is playing well and I’m winning games. Let’s just say that the month of November went by a little faster!"

At the bottom of that slump, did you start to doubt yourself?

"Not really, I’ve always had faith in my talent, and I thought I was capable of rebounding. At the beginning of October, I would quickly forget the losses and immediately think about my next start. [But] when you go several days without a win, you change your approach without wanting to. I was thinking about it too often and was
in a pretty bad mood at home. It was my girlfriend who had the most to put up with!  Still, I knew that the only solution lay in work and in practices. I gradually found my confidence again.

I also felt the support of my teammates. Like a good captain, Sidney Crosby took the time to slip me some words of encouragement. He simply said that I couldn’t have lost all my talent in just a month."

Have you changed any little details in your technique or in your pre-game routine?

"No, I haven’t changed anything. I just watched video with our goalie coach, Gilles Meloche."

Sidney Crosby said that Dan Bylsma should turn to you more often to bring you out of your lethargy. Did Bylsma take the time to talk with you?

"Yes, I had a good conversation with Dan. He wasn’t hard on me, he just wanted me to remain positive. He didn’t need any big motivational speech, I just liked that he spoke with me. Now, with six wins in a row, I no longer have to show up in his office. I like it better like that…"

There’s been an enormous amount of talk about Steven Stamkos since the start of the season, but the top scorer in the NHL can be found on your team. Have you seen Crosby being so dominant before?

"Sidney already has 41 points in only 26 games, that’s pretty incredible. Despite that, I don’t know if he’s at his personal best. He is so talented that you expect to see him dominate like that.

Crosby doesn’t have the chance to play with a Nicklas Backstrom or a Martin St-Louis, but he has created an exceptional chemistry with Chris Kunitz and Pascal Dupuis. He makes his teammates much better players. In my eyes, that is the sign of a truly good player."

On the blue line, Kristopher Letang has also been having quite a start, with 23 points (5 goals, 18 assists) in 26 games. How do you explain his emergence?

"There are several factors. First off, he is getting more ice time since the departure of Sergei Gonchar. And he’s now on the first power play unit.

I also believe that he has more confidence in his talent, he is less hesitant to join the attack. He has simply gained in experience and maturity. Kris has always had good skating ability, good vision, and a good shot. He’s using these assets better now."