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26 years ago Marty McSorley and Bob Probert had a fight for the ages

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A big time fight between two big legends of the enforcing world went down on this day

Probert Leaves The Ice Photo by Brian Miller/Getty Images

On this day 26 years ago, two titans of the hockey enforcing world squared off, and hooo boy, this one was a doozy of basically a bar knuckle boxing match on ice.

While many people feel like Luc Robitaille is a forgotten Penguin player over the ages, for me it’s probably more McSorley. Which is weird since Robitaille was a Penguin (1994-95) only one season after McSorley (1993-94) in this era, but both played limited games with Pittsburgh (47 for McSorley, 46 for Robitaille in a lockout shortened season). Older fans will also doubtlessly remember that was McSorley’s second stint with the Penguins, as he broke in with the team in 1983-84 and was an first year teammate to Mario Lemieux in 1984-85 before McSorely’s trade to Edmonton where he achieved most his fame as basically the personal enforcer for Wayne Gretzky over the rest of the ‘1980s.

Anyways, notice those old school “Snoop Dogg” diagonal jerseys in the fight video above? Couldn’t help but notice that was one of the jerseys that were used last week at the Mario Lemieux Foundation fantasy camp last week.

Not sure but I feel like a few years ago at this camp the yellow jerseys popped up and it wasn’t long until something similar was in the rotation for the NHL team as the current alternate jersey. That’s no guarantee that the popular diagonal jersey from the ‘90s will definitely be coming back soon, though with it’s popularity I would lean towards betting that sooner or later that type of design will likely be back at some point.

OK, just an observation but gotta point out those things when you see them. That aside of always fun jersey talk finished, the McSorley/Probert war on ice definitely is a throwback to the days of old and something that you’re most assuredly not likely to see in the NHL anytime soon. The old saying “they don’t make ‘em like that anymore” certainly applies to combatants as tough as McSorley and Probert both were.